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Chickenpox Vaccine Successful, Earwax Removal Not Recommended, Helmet Law Reduces Cycling Deaths
Chickenpox Vaccine Successful, Earwax Removal Not Recommended, Helmet Law Reduces Cycling Deaths

(September 3, 2008 - Insidermedicine) From Atlanta - According to research in the journal Pediatrics, the chickenpox vaccine introduced in 1995 has been a resounding success. Chickenpox-related hospitalizations have been reduced by over 75% and deaths from the disease have become extremely rare. However, experts worry that some parents do not consider chickenpox a serious threat. The disease, which commonly causes rash, itching and fever, can also cause skin infections, pneumonia, brain damage and death in extreme cases.

From Virginia - According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, earwax should not be routinely removed. The organization has released new clinical guidelines to help doctors identify patients with impacted wax and noted that, if the ears are functioning, then there is no reason to remove earwax, and that includes the use of cotton swabs. Earwax, a mixture of dead skin, hair and secretion, has both lubricating and antibacterial traits.

And finally, from Toronto - According to research in Pediatrics, a law requiring young cyclists to wear helmets has reduced the number of deaths from bike-related injuries. The study found that the number of deaths per year decreased by 52% among bicyclists under the age of 16 after the law came into effect. Passed in 1995, the law states that parents of children under 16 can be fined if their child is not wearing a helmet, and those aged 16 to 17 can be fined directly.

For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

 
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